SEDONA HISTORY


…a peaceful town settled in the foothills, below the Mogollon Rim, and it’s beauty is reflected by the surrounding red rocks.

Sedona history shows “Uptown Sedona”, located in Coconino County as the original settlement area; and, West Sedona, located in Yavapai County, the newer area.  After the Library and City Hall moved to West Sedona, the city began a population shift and growth of both residential and commercial areas.

Our pioneers were farmers who grew apples, peaches, and other fruits and vegetables along Oak Creek.

SEDONA HISTORY THE NAME:

T.C. Schnebly and his wife Sedona had 80 acres with a home/hotel located on Oak Creek where Tlaquepaque and Los Abrigodas now stand.  In need of a post office, T.C. submitted several names to the US Postmaster for acceptance, but they were considered to be too long.  The 3rd suggestion was “Sedona” which was accepted in June of 1902.


The Jordan family’s history is preserved in Uptown at the Sedona Heritage Museum in Jordan Park.

150 years ago, Oak Creek Canyon was the world to a small handful of our early settlers; and today, the City estimates we entertain 2-4 million visitors a year who come to our community and drive SR89A up Oak Creek Canyon.  That’s a big number for a city with only 10,000 year-round residents!

AVAILABLE ON CD BABY, ITUNES, AMAZON,etc.


TO MUTE MUSIC, CLICK ON PAUSE...


Native American Indians have lived in the Sedona region for centuries. Here is a song written by Terrie Frankel featuring the art of George Catlin (1796 - 1872) who spent decades painting American Indians, and whose art is featured in the Smithsonian Portrait Gallery. CLICK ON THE IMAGE BELOW TO START THE VIDEO. Song is available for download on iTunes.

  • Fran's Song - Greeting to Heaven by Terrie Frankel1:17
  • Forever Love0:00

Sedona - A Place to Experience


Sedona is located just at the base of the Mogollon Rim, featuring some of the most spectacular and picturesque canyons and buttes found anywhere in the world. The deep red color of Sedona’s rock formations is  is due to the presence of hematite - more commonly referred to as iron oxide or rust. Over 300 million hears ago, Sedona was under a sea of water. When the Colorado Plateau uplifted to create the Grand Canyon, there was also a cracking of the Earth in the Sedona area which carved out the canyons, streams and creeks. Water  carved layers of red sandstone, creating the rock formations we enjoy today, like Coffee Pot Rock, Chimney Rock, Steamboat Rock and Capitol Butte - all of which can be seen from House of the Seven Arches.


Sedona is a city that straddles the county line between Coconino and Yavapai counties in the northern Verde Valley region of the U.S. state of Arizona. As of the 2010 census, its population was 10,031. Sedona's main attraction is its array of red sandstone formations. The formations appear to glow in brilliant orange and red when illuminated by the rising or setting sun. The red rocks form a popular backdrop for many activities, ranging from spiritual pursuits to the hundreds of hiking and mountain biking trails.Sedona was named after Sedona Arabella Miller Schnebly (1877–1950), the wife of Theodore Carlton Schnebly, the city's first postmaster, who was celebrated for her hospitality and industriousness.



VORTEXES IN SEDONA Some say that all of Sedona is a Vortex (special energy emanating from the earth, both electrically and spiritually charged). However, certain historians say there are as many as 20 specific sites, which include: Bell Rock, Cathedral Rock, Airport Mesa and Boynton Canyon. Other Vortex sites have been noted on Schnebly Hill, Courthouse Butte, Chapel of the Holy Cross and of course the hill on which House of the Seven Arches is built. Visitors from all over the world come to Sedona to experience the healing powers that are perceived in these highly charged areas.